Drive-By Shooting, Perhaps? [720nm IR] | PT.I | 35:Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, structures

A Little Bit of Archery.


For over fifteen years, my shutter-finger has been tantalised by this rural church whenever I’ve driven the main road that passes by it, only a quarter of a mile away. Set in front of its beautiful tree-lined backdrop, behind rolling fields, I can’t understand why it’s taken me so long to take that little side-road in order to capture it. Though it’s early in the year and, the overhead conditions remain unpredictable, I spent a lovely hour here – simply investigating and, grabbing some IR frames. I do hope you’ll enjoy this initial instalment and, have a great week ahead. 

R.
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I | Closeburn Church | GR-720nm IR | 21mm – 1/100th – f8 – ISO:200

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II | Closeburn Church | GR-720nm IR | 28mm – 1/320th – f8 – ISO:100

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III | Closeburn Church | GR-720nm IR | 21mm – 1/125th – f8 – ISO:100

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Drumlanrig Castle [720nm IR] | PT.II | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, infrared, landscape, photography, structures

Pilgrim’s Progress | Ricoh GR Infrared.


III | Drumlanrig Castle, Thornhill | 720nm IR | 35mm Internal Crop / 4:3 – 125th – f8 – ISO:100

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IV | Drumlanrig Castle, Thornhill | 720nm IR | 35mm Internal Crop / 4:3 – 180th – f8 – ISO:100

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Drumlanrig Castle [720nm IR] | PT.I | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, infrared, photography, structures

About Turn | Ricoh GR Infrared.


Each of us has the right to change our minds. (That’s my excuse and, I’m sticking to it!) Insosaying, last month, I wrote a post about my newly converted GR – to 450nm, internally. The idea was that I’d be able to choose my preferred wavelengths for split-spectrum or infrared photography, but, things have been simplified rather, thanks to a few unwelcome dust-spots on its sensor. (Every cloud, an’ all that?) I arranged for the sensor to be cleaned and, in the interests of keeping the camera compact (without having to use the filter adapter for mounting an IR filter over the lens) I opted to have the internal 450nm glass removed and replaced with my preferred 720nm glass, instead. This has turned out to be a monumentally productive decision. 

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I | Drumlanrig Castle, Thornhill | 720nm IR | 35mm Internal Crop / 4:3 – 180th – f8 – ISO:100

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These two frames are the first that I’m publishing from this new conversion and, after what started out as an uncertain day for IR captures – I have to say that I am utterly blown away by what this GR-720nm can resolve. Compared to my X100 conversion, I definitely see more details in the GRs shadows, though the Fuji does have better overall dynamic range and, controls the highlights a little better. The GRs files do look more organic to me (which is why I have always loved them for black and white work) and, in such compact form, no longer having to use the filter adapter to capture frames like this, it’s ridiculous how little I have to carry in order to get results such as these. Happy? Pahhh… doesn’t even come close!

R.

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II | Drumlanrig Castle | 720nm IR + ND500 | 35mm Internal Crop / 4:3 – 8″ – f16 – ISO:100

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A Huge “Thank You!” | 35:Chronicle

personal, photography

Visions | One Year Ago.


It’s not often that I would make two posts in a day, however, I received a little reminder from our friends at WordPress, that 35:Chronicle Photography is – a year old, today! My, hasn’t it gone by quickly?! 

wpa

When I first decided to post here, I made myself a set of rules – sticking primarily to one focal-length in order to push myself a little harder in the hope that I might improve my eye and, with work and luck, hopefully too, to become more creative with my cameras. Coupled with my passion for black and white, visible light and infrared photography, though I have wavered from time to time in some areas, I am happy to know that in the main, I’ve stuck to my guns and though I cannot be the judge of my own progress, I do feel that I’ve learned more in this past year, than any other. This learning doesn’t happen all by itself though. 

Over the last twelve months, my pages and images have received over 8,000 views along with thousands of clicks, comments and, over 150 followers. This much, I could never have expected and to say that I have been overwhelmed is a little bit of an understatement. Your support, regular and frequent input, ideas, and the overall ethos of what an artistic community should represent and indeed does just that, spurs me on to write and share what it is that I absolutely love to do; to make photographs.

I would therefore like to share my most heartfelt thanks to all of you who read my pages whether you are WP subscribers or perhaps just occasional visitors, those of you who get involved, and those who create art in whatever form you do so, for my pleasure, learning and entertainment, also. I am continuously encouraged. To those close to me also for your patience and encouragement, and to work colleagues whom I may bore with my photographic blabberings on an almost weekly basis. To Amar (for your valued and consistent friendship, your amazing technical and scientific wizardry and, your wonderful infrared conversions, it has to be said) and to everyone who has helped me along the way, too. I’d also like to say hello and a big thank you to the members of the Guildford Photographic Society – I too browse your pages and images regularly and also appreciate the huge amount of talent you collectively possess. Keep up the wonderful work! Thank you too, to the people behind WordPress – for creating and maintaining a wonderful platform through which we can all share what we love.

With so much still to be done over the next twelve months – I do hope you’ll stick around and hopefully, enjoy what’s to come. 

Thank you!

R.


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Closer Still(s) | PT.XIX [II] | 35:Chronicle

28mm, black & white, close-up, macro, photography, still life

Shelling-Out | PT.II


Following on from my previous post, here are just a couple more macro / close-up frames taken with my newly acquired, hardly used GRD IV.  Getting a little closer has seldom been easier or, as much fun. (It just goes to show, huge investment isn’t always necessary.) I hope you’ll enjoy these and, have a great week ahead.

R.

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III | 2″ | f8 | ISO:80

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IV | 1″ | f5.6 | ISO:80

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Closer Still(s) | PT.XIX [I] | 35:Chronicle

28mm, black & white, close-up, macro, nature, photography, still life

Shelling-Out (for Reasonably Priced G.A.S).


Right-oh – this post is just for a little fun. A couple of weeks ago I had the opportunity to buy a cracking (barely tripped) little camera and all the trimmings at a bit of daft price and, as I’d had one around eight years ago (and sold it to fund my first GR), nostalgia for its punchy output got the better of me and so – ker-ching! (You know how it is, right?) Ricoh’s GRD IV was for me, a cracking little street camera but, it was also great for indoor candids; its black and white output has been praised ad-infinitum too, all over the inter-web – and with very good reason. (Check out the inimitable Olivier Duong’s page about it here, posted almost three years ago, at Inspired Eye if you’re interested). However, the real reason I bought it again, was to set it up in my macro studio.

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I. | 1″ | f5.6 | ISO:80

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With the combination of its small sensor and a minimum film speed of ISO/ASA:80, it’s a fabulous little thing for getting closer and providing plenty of DoF (depth of field) at macro-distances. I don’t know if it’s 1:2 or a 1:1 equivalent and frankly, I don’t care a hoot. It gets close. Though I didn’t exploit its 10mm  closest-focus, I did have a little bit of a play with a few shells that I’d pocketed from the beach last week, after I’d photographed the Thirlstane. To be honest, I really can’t see that much of a difference in IQ (image quality) at ISO80 at these close distances, to the ISO200 frames I grab with any of my APS-C set-ups. I’m sure there is a difference, I just can’t distinguish it. But for DoF, with IQ at this level – I think I’m going to enjoy playing with this little macro-monster more and more. Just when I thought I’d become an utter APS-C  (minimum) IQ-snob – I end up with this thing again, after all this time. Who’d have thunk it? I still love it!

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II. | 8” | f8.0 | ISO:80

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Thanks so much for reading, I do hope that you’ll enjoy these couple of frames and, are having a great weekend.

R.

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Inside Thirlstane Arch | PT.II of II | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, infrared, personal, photography

Overseeing? | Internal Dialogue.


Eddie Van Halen once answered (while being interviewed for a famous rock magazine in the 80s) a question as to his playing style, most specifically, his soloing techniques. As I recall, he explained that when he constructs solos – he likened it to “falling helplessly down a long staircase but landing on my feet”. The reason I mention this, is because though I imagined this post to just be another few images of what some might see as ‘just another rock’, I have ended up writing… stuff. A ramble, if you like. I just hope that by the end of it, I also land on mine; and though I have little sense of thought-structure right now, the top of the staircase is in full and daunting view and, I am left feeling as though my shoes are on the wrong way round, laces untied.

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IV | 35mm – 720nm Infrared.

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When it comes to a scene, where compositional possibilities are somewhat limited (either by subject, angle, light or, our own abilities) what would be the point in taking  just one or two frames and walking away? If a scene makes me buzz, I hang around – explore it, and keep shooting. Not for the sake of it, though. There’s nothing more tedious than going through the editing process later, and knowing that 75% of my frames are destined for the bin before I’ve even begun looking  at them. Spray and pray? Not my style, at all. So, purposeful engagement with a pleasing subject, loaded with potential compositional snaggery (I don’t believe this is actually a word but, it works for me) can often be beautifully rewarding. Impatience has no place here. Instead, time, exploration, looking, seeing and the changing of shooting techniques (and yes, different wavelengths too) – are all keys to finding a different view of what, on first appearance to the human eye, might have been quite – normal. Unremarkable, even. Like a rock, perhaps.

Without direction, by perhaps explaining just why, what or how I saw or appreciated any given composition, I prefer instead to not influence a pattern of thought in a viewer and allow elements to come to the fore – or not, for that person. As you are reading this too, for you. Should not the very initial dialogue between the image and the seer, be internal? Seeing is a very personal thing, isn’t it? Whether you might (or, not) see what I see, or saw – is of little consequence to me personally and though this probably sounds dismissive, arrogant, cold or selfish, even, this would be as far from the truth of it as the stars must be. The freedom to perceive is the right of one and, the only wish I have is that you’ll enjoy even some of my frames, in whatever ways you see them. When someone, anyone, says to me that something I have seen resonated with them also has to be the biggest compliments I can imagine, and yet, often, I will hear or read words suggesting that something that I didn’t see – did the same thing. And so I keep learning to ‘see’ more effectively. By listening, too, I learn to look. The reason I mention any of this comes from my own internal dialogues of late; the ones that ask me to answer questions – begging answers in explanation as to why I do this in this first place. 

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V | 35mm – VIS.

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Before I attempt to answer my own question(s) I must explain though, as the idea for this particular post seemed to be a natural sequel to my previous, my first few frames from Thirlstane, there were to be no paragraphs, no sentences, no stringing together of words – at all. I figured that all that I wanted to say was already written in PT.I. The introduction and the conclusion. Still, as others have also poignantly written, sometimes the words come when we least expected them to and, other times, we ache to write something, stare at a blank screen and poke our brains for what feels like mini-aeons, and – nothing comes out from the fingertips. Whatever the intention, the reality of creativity seems to seek itself out and, as a conduit for whatever is or isn’t inside us, we do or we just – don’t. I think it’s as simple as that.

Conscious creativity seems to me, the very hardest part of making images. I don’t know if I’m answering my own questions but the nearest I can get to concluding why I shoot, think and continue to explore photography is the simple knowledge that I do not believe I’ve made all that I can make. I haven’t seen my best photograph because I haven’t made it yet. I haven’t explored the full possibilities of what my own limitations will allow me to see and make, with light and shadow. Though I search, sometimes painfully consciously for creativity, it seems to me that when I just relax with it, don’t push myself to make anything happen, instead just capturing what I see, trusting what I do know and being relaxed with variables – even by accident and not even thinking about every single element, I find ridiculous amounts of enjoyment in seeing a moment; and then, feeling the camera in my hand, stealing it.

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VI | 35mm – VIS.

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Not for recognition, not for the struggle or competition, not for anything else except the pure enjoyment, the passion, the constant pre-excitation – for discoveries; and, being able to share it. What is a picture without anyone there to look inside it?  

Perhaps I’ve just landed? Only you know the answer to that one.

R.

[Frames V & VI: X100T | Frame IV: X100 720nm Conversion]
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Inside Thirlstane Arch | PT.I of II | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, infrared, photography

On Being Prepared.


Barely a few miles from our county’s popular resort of Southerness is situated the picturesque inlet and beach of Powillimount (pron: po-wil-i-mont). I’d never heard of it (despite having lived around here for almost twenty years). The weather wasn’t great, but the kids (who had been before) wanted to go back and find the ‘cave’, again. Me? I was going because I was promised a delicious fish ‘n’ chips with curry sauce, afterwards. It was a grey day, chilly, with the sun making only fleeting appearances between larger cloud-pockets. Nonetheless, I took cameras for both visible and infrared opportunities – should they have arisen. It’s impossible to know beforehand. I remember, before moving to Scotland, being told that if going out for a whole day in shorts, that I should also take an overcoat; and if it’s raining when heading out, not to forget my Factor 30. It’s kind of true – and I’m grateful for that. On arrival, rather than walk the beach, we headed straight for the ‘cave’, just a few minutes walk away. As it turns out, the ‘cave’ happens to be the Thirlstane; rather  popular for climbers and, clamberers alike – and, photographers, too. Goodie!

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I. | 35mm -VIS.

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While the boys clambered or kicked the football on the beach, hunted for ‘fossils’ or swirled sticks in low-tide rock-pools, A and I sat and took in the view out across the Solway towards a hazy Cumbrian coastline, and the peace (between childish cries of discovery, astonishment, self-congratulation, or any of the frequent, “Watch this!” moments. The whole time, as we chatted, I kept my eyes open, for light; and after the best part of an hour, it arrived. Sliding my backside off a low rock, I took a wander around and, made a few frames. The Arch itself however, was the only part I could consider worthy of photographic appreciation, so, I concentrated here. 

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II. | 35mm – 720nm Infrared.

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Shooting both visible light and at 720nm renders  light so wonderfully differently and though both set-ups have their own characteristics, I will always have a preference for IR for conducive subjects under suitable light, to visible-light. However – on days like this, having a small collection of the same scenes photographed using both bands of wavelengths, lends to the eyes an absolutely gorgeous comparison which I am hopeful (yet, also certain) upon review, of not actually needing to explain.

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III. | 35mm – VIS.

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Getting an exposure balanced just right is tricky when the difference between shade and light is so great, still, I am very happy with these few frames and, I do hope you’ll have enjoyed this first instalment.

R.

[Frames I & III: X100T | Frame II: X100 720nm Conversion]
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Ricoh GR | You Can Call Me – ‘Jack’ | 35:Chronicle

black & white, close-up, colour, full-spectrum, Indoor, infrared, landscape, macro, nature, night / low-light, personal, photography, review, ruins, structures

Photographic ‘Mechano‘? | A Few More Nuts & Bolts.


Two very special cameras have made up the mainstay of my shooting arsenal over the past eight years; the Fujifilm X100 (the debut, the ‘S’ and, the ‘T’) and, the Ricoh GR (also, the GR II). The model numbers don’t really make much of a difference to me because it’s all about how they allow me to work when I’m making pictures. Furthermore, my joy of them has nothing to do with button layouts, menu-order, online reviews, or much else either. It’s really all about the ability to carry a portable, capable and an ever more familiar set-up that produces very workable digital negatives shot through focal-lengths that I prefer the most. Shooting with shorter focal lengths has been my passion for a good number of years now, ever since I made the decision to give up on larger systems and telephoto lenses. That decision itself came from a notion that being out of range didn’t make me a better photographer at all – it wasn’t brave and, I always felt like I was on the outside looking in, instead of immersed in the process. That’s why I ditched the longer lenses. Simple. I wanted to learn more about photography and could no longer find satisfaction from picking-off frames from a distance – no matter how attractive I found focal-plane-to-background separation. The change was swift and, sharp.

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I. | Sir Duncan Rice Library Building – University of Aberdeen.

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After a few years with the Fuji-X I wanted something a little smaller for my pocket, for those days we all hanker for at one time or another – when we can grab the shots without carrying the bag as well; not a replacement as such, but a complement to my existing camera(s). By that time, I was completely hooked on shorter focal-lengths, the immersive experience of making pictures with them and that was when I bit the proverbial bullet on a GR – a camera that has been in my bag or my pocket for almost six years, no matter what else I have been shooting alongside it. Now, you may think that this is going somewhere a little bit too romantic and, you might be right. You see, out of every piece of equipment I have ever shot with over the last twenty-plus years, Ricoh’s GXRs and GRs have been my absolute favourite to use. The GR however, (even for all of the APS-C variants of the GXR) – tops the lot. I have no issue with admitting that the GR is (digitally speaking) the best, most customisable, usable camera with which I have ever made pictures. But the oddity in all of this is that – it just got even better. I’m not talking of anything Ricoh has done to it or, for it. It’s simply that as well as my standard model, I now have another, converted to split-spectrum with an internal 450nm filter. This might not sound like a big deal (especially if you’re more a colour enthusiast or just not a fan of black and white photography) but bear with me, and you’ll see that it actually – is.

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II. | Kinclair Viaduct.

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My first foray into split-spectrum and true full-spectrum happened when I had received a converted A16 unit for my old GXR a few years ago and, with that one unit, I was able to reduce issues of low-light black and white photography and shoot any alternative wavelengths that I chose to – usually near-infrared around the 720nm mark. In truth, my main love for a split-spectrum converted camera lies in the ability for me to choose different IR wavelengths as my base, when shooting, though primarily, I stick to 720nm (give or take around 20-30nm) – as I have done for the last twelve or so years. But it’s lovely to have the latitude when it’s needed. If any of you browsed through my images of St.Giles’ Cathedral in Edinburgh, late last year, you will notice, if you look, the clear benefits of shooting indoors with a split or full-spectrum converted camera as, such a set-up effectively doubles the shutter speed because the amount of wavelengths and subsequently, available light, is also doubled. For this kind of photography, black and white is really the only option (unless you’re into really funky colours and peculiar white-balance) and if you’re happy with this, you’d be even happier at the reduced (or complete absence of) camera / motion blur in your shots, not to mention the huge amounts of extra detail in the blacks and shadows.

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III. | St. Gile’s Cathedral – Edinburgh [Full Spectrum – Handheld].

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Now, a small admission. Originally, when I started drafting this post, my intention was to write some kind or report or, review, about my newest acquisition in the 450nm GR. But as that camera is only half of my story, I have decided to be more – general and, as my title suggests, I do consider the GR to be the most customisable camera I have ever had the pleasure of getting my hands on. The mere fact that I now have two of them, both set-up in completely different ways, for alternative shooting requirements, will bear this out. The fact that I have most of the accessories available for them, is also a factor in their importance in much of my work because, by and large, I don’t go in for huge amounts of add-ons for my gear and, prefer to keep weight down instead. But as weight is not really an issue with a camera so compact, I allowed myself to indulge in order to make them as useful as possible, to me. As well as both cameras, one standard and one converted, I also have three GH-3 filter adapters. On one, I have the IR 720nm filter, on another – a C-PL and on the third, a +10 close-up filter for a little extra macro. Having each filter mounted on separate adapters allows me to very quickly swap-out filters between cameras with just a click & twist. Obviously, the R72 filter adapter only gets exchanged with the +10 if I’m going to choose close-up work in IR or split-spectrum, but the C-PL can be swapped out for either of the other two, because as I have discovered, the standard GR set-up is also receptive to IR wavelengths with no hot-spotting, giving the shooting process a natural ND sequence. So, for long exposure IR imagery, the standard GR handles infrared rather well indeed. (I will do my best to show this as artistically as I am able, during the summer). With the addition of the GW-3 wide lens (which is pretty special, I must say) I can add a 21mm repertoire to each set-up at will, with custom functions set for (35mm) crop-mode and conversion-lens use, on each camera; not to mention the ability to set each of the unit’s three custom modes, for different set-ups. The fact that I love the GR’s output is the reason I shoot with it in the first place but, coupled with its mechano-like, Swiss Army-Knife tendencies – I really don’t feel like I’m missing out on anything for wide shooting, or – much else, for that matter.

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IV. | Bluebell.

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Of late, I have found myself preferring 4:3 output straight from the camera and have noted a benefit to this also, in post. The GR’s lens has a certain amount of natural light fall-off (vignetting) in the corners (especially when shooting at its native 28mm with front-mounted filters) and shooting at 4:3 reduces this somewhat unappealing effect by cropping out the far-lateral sides of the sensor. Added to the fact that 35mm is my preferred focal-length, this internal crop-mode when utilised alongside the 4:3 option, reduces fall-off further, while still providing me with a fairly respectable 9mp RAW file for processing, minus the rather noticeable fall-off. Again, many quick functions are simple and quick to set-up and I also have a ratio option on my adjust lever as well as 28/35mm crop on the effects button at the side of the camera. There’s not really a whole lot more that I can say of the 450nm converted camera, per se – it is what it is and as long as it’s raison d’etre is realised and understood, it’s an extremely useful tool for low-light, indoor photography where crushed blacks aren’t desired but organic detail is. For me – it’s there for IR in the main. But that’s just me. I still need my bag, of course – but even so it weighs next to nothing and, my bases are all covered.

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V. | Church Ruin [720nm Infrared].

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The GR has mostly been heralded as the ideal street camera to have, and I will not argue this. But what has not been extolled, as far as I am able to discover for myself, is that it can do so much more than street-photography; decent macro (with or without external filter assistance), landscape, environmental, urban exploration, and even alternative wavelength, I don’t think there’s much this thing can’t do. I have probably harped on enough now about this camera but I so want anyone who is truly interested, to know just how much a little camera can do in hands attached to a mind that wants to truly explore photographic possibilities.

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VI. | Horse-Chestnut [Sticky] Bud.

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The GR III is soon to be released in the UK (note: this post was published in early March 2019) – and I know right now that I won’t be buying one at any time in the near future. The main reason that I keep my Fujis is because of their handling, their viewfinders and the lovely files that I get to make with them. Insosaying, (because its screen can be rather hard to see in sunlight) if the new GR had been designed and built with a finder (a la pop-up EFV on Sony’s RX100 MK3 and onwards) then I doubt that the X100/IR or the ‘T’ would get much handling. If the GR III is as good as it’s going to get, then I’m sorry Ricoh- you already got it bang-on with the first one – nuts, bolts, the lot. And I’m not moving. I mean, what would be the point?

R.
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In the Still of the Light | PT.IV | 720nm IR | 35:Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins

The Ruin at the Cross | Finale.


Having had the pleasure of trying out my new GR conversion last week, I now have the pleasure of sharing with you the last two infrared frames, bagged during my saunter around the old church at the Cross, not far from my home. I have always enjoyed how the GR allows me to reproduce texture, contrast and visual detail (though, ironically perhaps, I care little for actual sharpness) especially as I shoot almost exclusively for black and white and, having this second GR in my bag (or occasionally, my pocket) really does extend potentials for  light-weight, no-fuss photography  – both for visible-light captures and for alternative wavelengths. 

I hope that these frames are as pleasing to your eye, as they are to mine. (Roll on, spring).

R.

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VI.

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(Both images photographed with a 450nm internally converted Ricoh GR, + front-mounted Hoya R72 IR filter.) 

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In the Still of the Light | PT.III | 720nm IR | 35:Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins

The Ruin at the Cross | PT.II.


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III.

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(Both images photographed with a 450nm internally converted Ricoh GR, + front-mounted Hoya R72 IR filter.) 


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In the Still of the Light | PT.II | 720nm Infrared | 35:Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins, structures

The Ruin at the Cross | PT.I.


These two frames are a taster of perhaps a few more to come, from a nearby church ruin. The fact that this single-storey derelict has its windows boarded-up is a little bit of a mystery to me and, a slight disappointment as it does rather mean that I can’t use those wonderful apertures as any kind of focal-point in any of my pictures. On the other hand, I am forced to put in more effort in my search for pleasing angles and views, and on such a day, I couldn’t think of anything better to do, than just that. 

(Both images photographed with a 450nm internally converted Ricoh GR, + front-mounted Hoya R72 IR filter at 28mm.) 

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II.

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First Shot from Ricoh GR 450nm Conversion | 715nm Infrared | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, infrared, photography, urban

Decisions, Decisions.


If you’re not interested in camera gear or those of us who harp on about it from time to time, you may want to switch the channel. Still, I’m not going to write a huge spiel here – not yet; there’ll be plenty of time for that, I know. However, what I will say is that last week, I received my latest alternative-wavelength conversion, in the form of my ol’ Ricoh GR. It’s had it’s internal IR-blocking filter removed, and that in turn has been replaced with 450nm glass, allowing me to shoot some lovely, detailed split-spectrum black and whites which will also absorb IR wavelengths under bright, outdoor light along with visible light above the 450nm threshold. Obviously, the the first reason I wanted this is because it’ll allow me to use IR filters of different wavelengths and, I can shoot it alongside my standard GR too without the need for a bag. My pair of Fujis need the bag but these two fit right in my jacket pockets without any fuss at all.  Insosaying, I took the bike out today, two GRs barely noticeable in the lower pockets of my jacket, and went for a leisurely spin. Those shots will come – but this one, was the first frame I bagged a few days ago (shot with a variable IR Gradient filter set to around 715nm, on the front element). 

The resolving power of this thing is just nuts despite the fact that this was shot using the GRs slightly lower resolution 35mm internal crop mode (in order to avoid vignetting from the hood). Though I have yet to compare its output with my 720nm converted X100 – for what I need, I know already it’s going to be impossible to have a preference. 

If you’re a fan of black and white IR, I hope you’ll appreciate this one. Experiment, play, repeat.

(A.V – thank you, my friend. It’s perfect!)

R.

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Peek-a-Boo | 35mm | 715nm Infrared.

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Every (Bloody) Penny | Princes Street, Edinburgh | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, photography, structures, urban

No Complaints – Honest!


Last year, during another of my annual pilgrimages to Edinburgh in order to enjoy some of the silly-season’s festivities, I did what I always do not long after I arrive – that is, to pay nothing short of a small fortune to board the Edinburgh Wheel at Princes Street Gardens and, make three full rotations before being booted-off. (One has to laugh, I suppose.) However, though I utterly begrudge the abusing of the general good-nature and festive-charity of the average, joy-seeking tourist, I can’t complain one bit when I have come away with a few frames that I couldn’t possibly have got, without having been royally fleeced, beforehand. So, here are my two chosen frames from inside my pod at the very top of the slowly rotating Ferris-wheel – looking out first over Princes Street Gardens, Waverley Station and towards the Royal Mile, and secondly, through the car’s rain-smeared window at the Scott Monument and along Princes Street itself. In a nutshell? For me anyway, worth every bloody penny!

R.

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I | Princes Street Gardens, Waverley, Royal Mile | 35mm.

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II | Scott Monument, Princes Street | 35mm.

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Views from a Ridge | PT.IV | 35:Chronicle

28mm, black & white, infrared, landscape, photography

Portrait of Talla. 

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Small Beginnings | 28mm – 760nm Infrared.

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Thank you for visiting. If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided.
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