Infrared w/UG-11 | Conclusion | 35:Chronicle

50mm, black & white, infrared, photography, ug-11

Yes, It Can | But…


Now this post may seem a little redundant and may not interest many at all but, I’m going to write it anyway. It may help someone. Furthermore, the images posted here will be the last IR captures from my UG-11 unit, and, with very good reason.

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Stacks | 1/70th | f4.0 | ISO-800

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UG-11 is predominantly a filter for shooting UV light only and, I have little interest in UV shooting. However, I love to experiment, to push capabilities; I also love infrared photography and, the UG-11 does allow IR light transmission too, though, there is a caveat. Having reviewed the UG-11 datasheet before I ever even experimented with it, it’s clear from the graphs that UV wavelengths from around 230-410nm are captured, quickly peaking at 92% transmission at 330nm and then, quickly dropping off again. Visible light is blocked completely. Infrared light is also transmitted through the filter to the sensor from just over 650nm however there is no visible transmission of IR light until around 680nm. IR light transmission peaks at around 715nm yet at only around 30%, and gradually fades to 800nm, where, transmission of IR drops to between 1 and 5% all the way through to around 1200(+)nm. In other words, from under 800nm, IR light is barely appreciable in visible terms. 

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Almost There (But, Not Quite!) | 1/60th | f5.6 | ISO-1234 (This is not a typo!)

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Being as how IR light has such a hard time getting through, when using a UG-11 to capture it, one finds themselves in a very similar position as if using a normal, unconverted camera, an IR filter on the lens and a tripod. Shutter speeds are slow and the only way to shoot handheld is by utilising high ISOs. This is not always desirable, and, neither is carrying a tripod everywhere. The other issue I have found is that, not only are shutter speeds slower when compared to a bona-fide IR conversion, however, the amount of NIR (near-infrared) radiation captured (even with longer shutter-speeds) is noticeably reduced. The Wood effect is there, sure, but it’s definitely muted. Feel free to peruse my most recent few posts and note that all of those frames posted were taken on extremely bright days and WB was always set to foliage or grass for each subject. They’re still lacking the punch that I have always been used to capturing when using any other conversion. Having said this, I should also say that I don’t like having to create drama using post-processing, and with UG-11, it is unfortunately, necessary to work this way. Having read that UG-11 is good for capturing IR too – I have to contest it’s true value in this particular genre and claim that it is not even close to being on par with a properly converted camera. Yes, it can do it – but far better results will be obtained from a proper IR conversion. This, by the way, leads me to sharing some good news. 

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Muted ‘Wood’ (Full-Sun) | 1/125th | f5.0 | ISO-1000

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My good friend, The Doctor,  in Guildford, received a couple of my camera units this week and, having opened them up on his slab already, has now completed their conversions. Very soon, I shall be in possession of dedicated 760nm and 715nm units, which, I know for a fact I am going to enjoy, certainly while the sun continues to shine, (more than even I probably realise right now). 


It’s a niche, for sure; but there is a growing interest in IR photography and I am very happy indeed to be, not just one who captures it, but also as a source of guidance or information for those who are already or, wish to get involved. My contact page is a click away so do feel free to get in touch. As always, thank you for reading and if IR is your bag, stay tuned!

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Down at the Farm | Infrared w/UG-11 | 35:Chronicle

35mm, 50mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, landscape, nature, photography, skies, structures, ug-11

Further Infrared Trials with UG-11.


I am soon going to be writing up a number of my thoughts about shooting infrared, utilising the internal UG-11 filter, however, being seriously pushed for time lately, I’m keen to get a few more images up for those of you who may be interested in the topic. Though I have been interested in infrared photography for many, many years, I have to say that the UG-11 is (though, mainly for UV shooting) very capable of IR, but, there’s a learning curve to be addressed, despite my lengthy experience in the field. I hope to discuss many points on this very soon. For now, a few frames – shot using a 33mm prime on an APS-C sensor (giving a 50mm FoV), quickly processed in LR. Enjoy…  

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All Quiet | 1/4sec – f8 – ISO:100 [Tripod]

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The Last of the Season | 1/220th – f5.6 – ISO: 3200 [Handheld]

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With the Breeze | 1/3sec – f10 – ISO:100 [Tripod]

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Foxgloves | PT.II of II | 35:Chronicle

50mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, nature, photography, ug-11

VIS & IR | Monochrome.


I’ll be brutally honest here, I am not half as keen on the colour frames in my previous post as I am with the black and whites. The form of the Foxglove, in my humble thingummyjig, lends itself far more conducively to mono-output than colour and, besides, under bright sunlight, it’s far more forgiving with having to pay far less regard to accurate white balance. Nonetheless, they please me way more. 

As well as shooting visible light, I also had a play around with my UG-11 equipment, capturing a couple of frames in broad-spectrum infrared. I do need to experiment with these wavelengths a lot more to get the best from them and, hope to pursue to more IR landscaping with it as soon as I get enough free time. 

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I. | VIS

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II. | Infrared w/UG-11 + UV

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III. | Infrared w/UG-11 + UV

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IV. | VIS

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I Was Just Rummaging in my Drawers! | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, nature, photography, ug-11

Experiment: UG-11 – UV =  ∼650-1250nm IR.


For well over ten years, I have enjoyed playing around with different wavelengths in my personal photography, most notably, with infrared wavelengths between around 700 and 850nm. These two frames were captured with the only equipment I have currently, that is able to record IR wavelengths, but it’s not ideal for the job as such. They were captured using a UG-11 conversion.

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I. | 35mm • ISO 1600 • Infrared w/UG-11

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UG-11 blocks visible light from reaching the image sensor, allowing over 99% UV light transmission from around 235-410nm however, much less IR transmission from around 650-1250nm peaking at around only 30% transmission at close to 715nm. This makes UG-11 ideal for UV photography (think: flowers or forensic applications) but less ideal for IR shooting. Though there is no need for an IR filter to be mounted on to the front of the lens (because visible light is already being blocked) a simple UV filter is adequate in order to allow only IR wavelengths to pass. However, because the peak light-transmittance of IR wavelengths is only around 30% of a dedicated IR conversion, it does mean that unless one is happy to record their images at higher ISOs in order to shoot handheld, a tripod will still be required. (Shooting this configuration with a tripod at base ISO would render some fabulous cloud or water movement due to longer Tv necessities for accurate exposures, I would imagine.) Furthermore, good strong sunlight is a must if shooting (handheld) infrared in this way and, as I have discovered, duller daylight is far less forgiving when capturing IR with a UG-11 than it would be with a dedicated IR converted unit. 

I’m sure, not least because of my passion for alternative-wavelength photography, that I will be coming back to discuss this topic in a lot more depth in the future, but thought I’d share a couple of handheld frames captured recently with a 35mm UG-11 conversion that I rediscovered at the back of a drawer. I’m not sure I have a specific use for UV photography yet, but it’s fun to play around with possibilities, nonetheless.

This is just a little frippery so please, don’t judge me on composition.

Enjoy!

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II. | 35mm • ISO 800 • Infrared w/UG-11

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