In the Still of the Light | PT.II | 720nm Infrared | 35:Chronicle

black & white, infrared, photography, ruins, structures

The Ruin at the Cross | PT.I.


These two frames are a taster of perhaps a few more to come, from a nearby church ruin. The fact that this single-storey derelict has its windows boarded-up is a little bit of a mystery to me and, a slight disappointment as it does rather mean that I can’t use those wonderful apertures as any kind of focal-point in any of my pictures. On the other hand, I am forced to put in more effort in my search for pleasing angles and views, and on such a day, I couldn’t think of anything better to do, than just that. 

(Both images photographed with a 450nm internally converted Ricoh GR, + front-mounted Hoya R72 IR filter at 28mm.) 

*
I.

35chronicle.118 (1)

*
II.

35chronicle.118 (2)

*
HOME A RATIONALE | LIGHT-WAVES | ARCHIVES | LINKS
Thank you for visiting. If you would like updates, please click Follow. All Images & Posts © 35:Chronicle (2018, 2019) except where specified. No Copying or Redistribution of any kind is permitted without prior consent from the author, unless links to original work is clearly provided.
*

 

Advertisements

13 thoughts on “In the Still of the Light | PT.II | 720nm Infrared | 35:Chronicle

    1. There were two reasons I chose that angle for the second shot, actually. but I won’t take the romance out of the frame by telling you, Alena. 🤪 I’m not sure genius has much to do with my work but I am delighted you think so! You’ve absolutely made my day! Thank you, A! 🙏📷

      Liked by 1 person

  1. Something about cemeteries. Kind of intriguing in a historical perspective. Many stories there. And even the markers are impermanent. The lichens grow on granite, slowly dissolving it. Great angles on your shots.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you, H. Like most, I’m intrigued by such places. A reminder of a final destination and of just how important it is to appreciate everything before it. How we mark the pasts of others hasn’t really changed either, a respectful familiarity of those we’ve never even known. Or what they may have achieved in life. So glad you like these. 🙏

      Liked by 1 person

    2. I think, by your comments, I must sometimes achieve what I hope for most; to engage a viewer. I’m very happy to read your thoughts, H. Detail or sharpness aren’t elements I pay too much attention to as much as decent focus, ironically, unless I’m shooting macro. For normal focal-length, scenic photography, my only real considerations are light and framing but if I’m ever pleasantly surprised by any frames on review, well, that’s a good sign for me. It’s all very casual really, believe it or not, and I hardly process in post at all. I really am glad that you see what you see. Very grateful, indeed! 🙏

      Liked by 1 person

    3. Your framing, and this goes without saying, is very artistic. I bet if you sat down with 6 people and showed them one of your works they would all pick out different details that capture their eye and give you different interpretations of what they see and feel – and that is true art. For the image you capture raises more in their minds 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

    4. It’s not often I struggle for a response but, you got me there, H! I think that would be an interesting conversation indeed; I’d probably wait outside the door, though and wait for conclusions. 😂 Thank you! 🙏 📷

      Liked by 1 person

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.