Foxgloves | PT.II of II | 35:Chronicle

50mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, nature, photography, ug-11

VIS & IR | Monochrome.


I’ll be brutally honest here, I am not half as keen on the colour frames in my previous post as I am with the black and whites. The form of the Foxglove, in my humble thingummyjig, lends itself far more conducively to mono-output than colour and, besides, under bright sunlight, it’s far more forgiving with having to pay far less regard to accurate white balance. Nonetheless, they please me way more. 

As well as shooting visible light, I also had a play around with my UG-11 equipment, capturing a couple of frames in broad-spectrum infrared. I do need to experiment with these wavelengths a lot more to get the best from them and, hope to pursue to more IR landscaping with it as soon as I get enough free time. 

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I. | VIS

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II. | Infrared w/UG-11 + UV

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III. | Infrared w/UG-11 + UV

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IV. | VIS

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Foxgloves | PT.I of II | 35:Chronicle

50mm, close-up, colour, nature, photography

Pretty in Pink?


The woodlands and scrub around my house are festooned with Foxgloves and, it would be remiss of me if I weren’t to have a little fun with them. It’s easy to see why this flower is a very popular subject for photo-enthusiasts. In this first instalment, I concentrate only on the colour frames – the final image being made indoors, as the breeze began to hamper my efforts somewhat, even with the use of the tripod.

I hope you’ll enjoy these few grabs.

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I.

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II.

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III.

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IV.

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Harbouring Light | Infrared | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, boats, infrared, photography, skies, waterscape

Downtime at the Waterside | 35mm / 720nm IR


I.

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II.

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III.

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I Was Just Rummaging in my Drawers! | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, close-up, infrared, nature, photography, ug-11

Experiment: UG-11 – UV =  ∼650-1250nm IR.


For well over ten years, I have enjoyed playing around with different wavelengths in my personal photography, most notably, with infrared wavelengths between around 700 and 850nm. These two frames were captured with the only equipment I have currently, that is able to record IR wavelengths, but it’s not ideal for the job as such. They were captured using a UG-11 conversion.

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I. | 35mm • ISO 1600 • Infrared w/UG-11

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UG-11 blocks visible light from reaching the image sensor, allowing over 99% UV light transmission from around 235-410nm however, much less IR transmission from around 650-1250nm peaking at around only 30% transmission at close to 715nm. This makes UG-11 ideal for UV photography (think: flowers or forensic applications) but less ideal for IR shooting. Though there is no need for an IR filter to be mounted on to the front of the lens (because visible light is already being blocked) a simple UV filter is adequate in order to allow only IR wavelengths to pass. However, because the peak light-transmittance of IR wavelengths is only around 30% of a dedicated IR conversion, it does mean that unless one is happy to record their images at higher ISOs in order to shoot handheld, a tripod will still be required. (Shooting this configuration with a tripod at base ISO would render some fabulous cloud or water movement due to longer Tv necessities for accurate exposures, I would imagine.) Furthermore, good strong sunlight is a must if shooting (handheld) infrared in this way and, as I have discovered, duller daylight is far less forgiving when capturing IR with a UG-11 than it would be with a dedicated IR converted unit. 

I’m sure, not least because of my passion for alternative-wavelength photography, that I will be coming back to discuss this topic in a lot more depth in the future, but thought I’d share a couple of handheld frames captured recently with a 35mm UG-11 conversion that I rediscovered at the back of a drawer. I’m not sure I have a specific use for UV photography yet, but it’s fun to play around with possibilities, nonetheless.

This is just a little frippery so please, don’t judge me on composition.

Enjoy!

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II. | 35mm • ISO 800 • Infrared w/UG-11

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A Bridge Too Far? | Personal Narrative | 35:Chronicle

35mm, black & white, landscape, personal, photography, spring, structures, trees

Kinclair Viaduct | Pinmore.


This post is a little more personal to me than many of my others and, it’s a little difficult even trying to figure out how best to introduce it. But introduce it I must, and, with important reason. When I say that I consider my 35 to be the lens for life, I mean exactly this. For all aspects of life. I suppose that the same could be said of any passtime or endeavour whereby the passage of time and (or) memories are recorded and, here, with my one prime, again, I have both. It’s wide enough to see and record the periphery of the life in front of us, yet narrow enough to preserve the little details there too, which, should not be forgotten. Hence, they can be perfectly preserved, in time. If I’m making no sense, perhaps I can be clearer. 

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I. | The House Under the Bridge.

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II. | Nine of Eleven.

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These images are from the second time I ever saw this structure; they were taken on Monday, this week. I drove a round-trip of over 200 miles specifically to photograph it. Whatever the weather was to be, I would capture it. That is why, during mid-morning, I packed a waterproof jacket, my camera gear, my lunch, a flask of coffee and an extra pack of menthol cigarettes, and set off to Pinwherry and, just north, to Pinmore. Yes, I carried memories with me and couldn’t help but feel thin air from the conspicuously empty front-seat in my car, amplified by the knowledge of the direction in which I was now heading.

The first time I ever saw this structure, the passenger-seat to my left was occupied and, we were on our way home, passing through Girvan and south along the A714, returning from a visit to Ayrshire, (which was memorable itself by the mini-rant I had had that day about less than stellar customer service and charging punters full admission price to a place that was only half-open and, had not been advertised as such upon reviewing the relevant website the day before. I still believe my point to be valid, however, I digress). That late-afternoon journey home was in fact, for me at least, the most enjoyable part of the day, not least for the company of one special to me, but also for the beautifully scenic landscapes under late-afternoon sun and, the ability to simply – share the feeling.  Then, we arrived at Pinmore, still heading south and, passing under this incredible viaduct, (eleven arches in all) I scanned frantically for a place to park whilst conscious of the BMW behind me, trying to ‘push’ me along and around the ever present s-bends. Failure to find a suitable stopping point was inevitable and all that we could do was to marvel at the enormity of the thing as it vanished steadily, behind us. I vowed that we would go back. But I am one half of we, now. And even so, without we, I – would never have seen this place and so, it seems unfair, morally wrong and, emotionally impossible for me to not acknowledge the fact. 

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III. | Ten of Eleven.
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IV. | From the South.

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On my return, I noted a few things to myself. One, there is only one space at the roadside anywhere near here, big enough to park the car off the road and, good luck finding it empty if I should return; two, in spring and summer, the trees are so thick and tall as to almost hide this structure from the roadside, probably until late autumn (so I shall head back then, too or perhaps even during winter); three, from ground-level it is so difficult to appreciate just how majestic and huge this viaduct is and so, I shall need to find higher-ground when I return to Pinmore, which I will. From closer distances, the stonework can be better appreciated, for certain, and, though the light was occasionally tricky, I still, on review, enjoy the vantage-point. Even though I did have to quickly jump into the roadside scrub to avoid being mowed down, I didn’t feel rushed – just a little, half-there. There should have been a familiar voice hollering, “Car!” whenever my back was to the tarmac. Whilst the views were fabulous, to me, there was an inevitable notion of – hollow. But I was glad to be back. Though tricky to photograph, it is an amazing feeling to even stand beneath one its arches. 

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V. | From the North.

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Alas, life is how it is, but it is served no purpose by forgetting what it was. The way I see it, to photograph life is the best way to capture, remember and appreciate just that – no matter in which direction we’re heading. 

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Closer Still(s) | PT.VIII | 35:Chronicle

35mm, close-up, colour, Indoor, nature, photography, spring

Spring Broom | PT.II of II.


Righto, this is the second of two posts (otherwise it gets boring!) containing shots that I made last week of the gorgeous red and yellow broom flowers that are in massive numbers at the back of my house right now. They truly are stunning little flowers and, though most of the shrubs are offering yellow flowers only, there is just one out of the entire lot of ’em that has given up these beautiful variations, the like of which I have not witnessed before. To look at them with the naked eye, they are not all that remarkable, however, when getting up-close and very personal with these 15mm or so flowers, they do take on a much more intricate character, if that can be said of a plant? 

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IV. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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V. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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My macro / close-up set-up is pretty basic really and shooting only with a 35mm lens (which is not a macro-lens either) does make my choices very simple – I either can shoot what I envisage or, I can’t. It’s as simple as that. There are of course limitations but these only serve me to do my best to get more creative with what I do have in my bag. Yes, I have mentioned my little 49mm Hoya +10 Close-up filter a few times but I cannot stress how abso-bloody-lutely brilliantly useful that little filter is. Having spent countless thousands of pounds on photographic equipment over the many years I have been enjoying the art, it truly is a revelation to know that instead of forking out (and carrying around) more lenses, I have finally managed to put together a collection of three cameras and a few filters that even collectively weigh less than my last DSLR with it’s 50/1.4 mounted. Picky, I am indeed and I would be the first to be unhappy with my images if my chosen rigs weren’t producing the goods that I work towards – and the only duds I ever find are those reflecting my own mistakes. 

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VI. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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I love these images and I am very happy to have made them – yet, though I don’t expect anyone else to share my utter enjoyment of them, I do hope that some will find a little pleasure in them. Such an understated plant and yet, so full of form and vibrance that I find incredibly appealing. To have these frames is a real pleasure for me because, very soon, the garden floor will be coated in a carpet of faded yellow petals and, the hedgerows? Well, they’re certainly going to be left wanting, aren’t they?

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VII. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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Click for PT. I of II

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Closer Still(s) | PT.VII | 35:Chronicle

35mm, close-up, colour, nature, photography, spring

Spring Broom in Bloom | PT.I of II.


I. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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II. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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III. | 35mm w/Hoya +10

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Click for PT.II of II

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